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ISSN
0898-929X
E-ISSN
1530-8898
2014 Impact factor:
4.69

Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience

April 2009, Vol. 21, No. 4, Pages 791-802
(doi: 10.1162/jocn.2009.21055)
© 2008 Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Motor-induced Suppression of the Auditory Cortex
Article PDF (241.19 KB)
Abstract

Sensory responses to stimuli that are triggered by a self-initiated motor act are suppressed when compared with the response to the same stimuli triggered externally, a phenomenon referred to as motor-induced suppression (MIS) of sensory cortical feedback. Studies in the somatosensory system suggest that such suppression might be sensitive to delays between the motor act and the stimulus onset, and a recent study in the auditory system suggests that such MIS develops rapidly. In three MEG experiments, we characterize the properties of MIS by examining the M100 response from the auditory cortex to a simple tone triggered by a button press. In Experiment 1, we found that MIS develops for zero delays but does not generalize to nonzero delays. In Experiment 2, we found that MIS developed for 100-msec delays within 300 trials and occurs in excess of auditory habituation. In Experiment 3, we found that unlike MIS for zero delays, MIS for nonzero delays does not exhibit sensitivity to sensory, delay, or motor-command changes. These results are discussed in relation to suppression to self-produced speech and a general model of sensory motor processing and control.